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Morgiana
Suns Cinema
Washington, DC
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Morgiana
Klara and Viktoria are sisters. Their father dies, leaving most of his property to Klara. When Klara becomes involved with a man that her sister loves, Viktoria begins to plot her murder.

Juraj Herz, director of the acclaimed and creepy The Cremator, wants us to look upon Morgiana (1972) as a stylistic exercise. And certainly the aspect of the film that first hits is the disturbing, crazy-house visuals, a combination of fisheye lurch and decadent, Klimt-inspired design, with psychedelic colour experiments and shots taken from the point of view of a Siamese cat. Add in the sinister, seductive score and the extreme, silent-movie theatrics of lead actress Iva Janzurová, and the stylistic richness of the film might tend to overwhelm any content.

In fact, that content was surgically removed at the demand of the Czech censors who, in the years following the Prague Spring, were particularly sensitive. The film as it stands documents, or dreams, the melodramatic and murderous battle between two sisters (both played by Janzurová, normally a comedy actress), but Herzs original plan, derived from the source novel by Alexander Grin, was to reveal halfway through the film that only one sister exists. A case of multiple personality disorder was apparently too disturbing for the state to accept, so the plot twist was deleted before filming was allowed. (MPD has been diagnosed almost exclusively in America, so perhaps the communist state could not accept the implication of it crossing the iron curtain?)

From Herzs point of view, this undercut the whole point of the film, but he was forced to proceed anyway. He entertained himself by coming up with crazy visual ideas, although with the doubling of the main actress the shoot was already arduous enough. Should I have told you this? Does knowing that its author believes it to be senseless prejudice you against investigating the films meaning? I dont think it should: the film pretty openly declares itself a piece of fin-de-siècle pop-art extravagance from the off. The warring sisters theme often invites comparisons with Whatever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962), although The Dark Mirror (1946) and A Stolen Life (1946) more directly anticipate the use of one actress in two roles. Whatever the Western influence might be, melodrama is the keynote of Iva Iva Janzurovás performances, Herzs approach and the operatic tone set for the whole movie.

If the films intended meaning was killed by censorship, so that only the casting hints at Herzs duality theme, can we divine our own meanings from the kaleidoscopic whirl of images? I think perhaps we can, but they are always going to be provisional and incomplete. Rather than risk encoding any subversive message into this work, the filmmaker has satisfied himself with an echoing void, surrounded by beautiful colours and striking scenes. Whatever we yell into this chasm will echo back to us, distorted and fragmented, and that will have to be our meaning. DAVID CAIRNS

"The casting of Iva Janzurova as both sisters is a masterstroke of makeup artistry as much as acting and editing... While perhaps lesser known in Herzs oeuvre than Spalova Mrtvol (The Cremator, 1968) or Petrolejové Lampy (Oil Lamps, 1971), his fairy tale of two sisters, seen through cats eyes and mirrors, serves as a haunting bookend to the Czech New Wave which began a decade prior." SENSES OF CINEMA

"Romantic drama set in 1910 approximately. Juraj Herz masterfully plays with genres and codes by inviting the fairy tales of our childhood and gothic horror at the party. I was so immersed in this schizophrenic story that I didn't notice that Iva Janzurova plays two different characters. Masterpiece." Daniel S, MUBI

"If this is what life truly looks like through the eyes of a feline, than we should all wish to be so lucky." David, SUNS CINEMA

Location

Suns Cinema (View)
3107 Mount Pleasant Street NW
Washington, DC 20010
United States


Categories

Film > Movies

Minimum Age: 21

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