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IDEO 2017 Annual Conference & State High School Dance Festival: Embodying Healthy Practices
College of Education University of Idaho
Moscow, ID
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Thank you for supporting arts education in Idaho! Sincerely, Rachel Swenson, IDEO President





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IDEO 2017 Annual Conference & State High School Dance Festival: Embodying Healthy Practices
IDEO Fall Conference & State High School Dance Festival 2017


Presenters for: Embodying Healthy Practices


Keynote Presenter: Mary Lou Seereiter is a Registered Movement Therapist, Certified Practitioner and Teacher of Body Mind Centering®, a Certified Laban Movement Analyst and Authentic Movement Facilitator. She is the Program Director of Moving Within Somatic Movement Education Program through the School Of Body-Mind Centering® and the Co-Educational Director of the Program with Amy Matthews. Mary taught dance and Somatics at Lane Community College for 34 years, 1980 to 2016.  The first 25 of those years she served as Director of the Dance Program.  In that time she hosted several Dance Intensives and corresponding concerts with such notables as Repertory Dance Theatre from Utah, Bill Evans and Susan Marshall Dance Company. At LCC, Mary specialized in all levels of modern and jazz dance, beginning and intermediate ballet. She developed and taught several courses in somatics and anatomy for dancers, choreography, improvisation and composition. She was a prolific choreographer, creating works for Lane Dance Theatre and her company, C. Rider Dance Company.  Mary also taught classes in the Therapeutic Rehabilitation Program in the Physical Education Department at LCC.  Mary has taught on the faculty for several somatic programs including: Amy Matthews, Embodied Anatomy and Yoga Program in Portland, Oregon; the Center for BodyMind Movement, Certification Program in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and in Lorane, Oregon; The School for Body-Mind Centering® in North Hampton, Massachusetts. Recently she presented a workshop for National University of Natural Medicine in Portland, Oregon. As visiting scholar at Ohio State University, she taught in the graduate Somatics Program at OSU and as a guest teacher in OSU Dance Department. She was a recipient of the Distinguished Alumni Award for outstanding contributions to her field from the University of Oregon School of Music and Dance. Mary Lou continues to offer workshops, classes and private sessions at her Studio in the Woods in Lorane, Oregon. She is one of the two core teachers in Moving Within BMCSM certification program. For more information go to: movingwithin.com

IDEO Friday Workshop: Body-Mind Centering® Developmental Movement Concepts and Experiential Practices.  
Through play and experiential learning, we will explore developmental concepts that establish a healthy relationship with self and other and support learning. Tapping into group wisdom, we will dialogue about the essential concepts of survival, comfort, bonding and curiosity. Through interactive movement, we will investigate how the developmental patterns of Yield, Push, Reach and Pull create a potential balance of internal and external focus and inner and outer awareness which can therefore support a balance in the Nervous System and the inter-relatedness between Parasympathetic, Sympathetic and Somatic Nervous Systems. We will learn through movement sequences and progressive development from upper to lower, head to tail, proximal to distal how these concepts can be reinforced through creative activities to promote optimal abilities.  

IDEO Conference Keynote Session #1: Healthy Practices in Teaching and Learning.  
There is no one size fits all in Healthy Practices. Each individual is unique and what is healthy for one is not necessarily healthy for another. However, there are some principles from various fields in neuroscience, brain research, education, developmental movement/ontogeny and embodiment and somatic practices that we can employ to address and facilitate healthy practices.  By posing questions that engage individual curiosity and pursuit of personal healthy practices, we can begin the journey. How does communication interpersonally and intra-personally enhance or inhibit health? How does the body respond to information? What is the correlation between learning and health? How do we facilitate learning? How does the body interface with the brain in health and learning? How do emotions impact learning? How does personal history impact learning? How is movement related to health and learning? What practices support health and learning? Through movement, group activities, discussion and sharing, we will explore these questions.

IDEO Breakout Session: Sensory/Motor Balance in Health and Learning.  

Through movement and from a Body-Mind Centering® perspective, we will explore the connection between sensing and motoring (moving). The question of how we take in information and how we respond to that information will support the explorations of this session.  

IDEO Conference Keynote Session #2
In this session, we will have the opportunity to review concepts presented and create time and structures to integrate the material.  




Session Title: TBD


Belle Baggs is a dancer, choreographer, and teacher. She is currently faculty and Co-Program Coordinator of the University of Idaho Dance Program. She received her MFA in Modern Dance from the University of Utah and is a CLMA and Yoga teacher (200RYT). She has an extensive performance career and danced professionally as a member of influxdance, a company based in Salt Lake City. In 2015 her work Settle/Unsettle premiered at the 92nd Street Y in NYC as part of a choreographic intensive with Doug Varone. She is proud to be a founding member of the BASK Art Collectivea group engaging in extended community projects and sources of empowerment for women in the Arts. She is pleased to be on the board of IDEO and looks forward to supporting and strengthen the vision of dance education and the Arts in Idaho.


Session Title: Caring for the Whole Dancer

The growth and progression of dance as an art form has increased the demand on dancers bodies, both artistically and athletically. Dancers increase their technique and athleticism to rise to and exceed the challenges presented to them. While admirable  and arguably necessary  the increase in activity can impact both body and mind. Unfortunately, the resulting conditions are often ignored. When they are acknowledged, they may not be dealt with properly for fear of interrupting training, decreasing technique, or disturbing aesthetics. The ever-changing demands placed on dancers makes it increasingly important for them to be aware of their injuries and the therapies available to treat those injuries. Proper care, provided in a timely manner, can help promote total wellness. Creating, maintaining, and utilizing healthy relationships between dancers and athletic trainers can lead to better body awareness and ultimately extend the lifespan of a dancers career. In the interest of all the prior information, there are several goals of this presentation:
1.To understand pain appraisal, management, and coping mechanisms commonly found in dancers;
2.To demonstrate one potential screening technique to help recognize faulty movement patterns in dancers and assess risk of injury;
3.To introduce several different methods of therapy that may be useful to dancers; 4. To suggest ways to integrate dance programs with athletic training programs.

Koreen Boydstun is a native of Boise where she grew up dancing for Ballet Idaho and Pat Harris School of Dance. She completed a Bachelors degree in Dance and another in Exercise Science from Idaho State University in Pocatello in 2016. During her time in Pocatello she danced and choreographed with the University and a community group called The Company. She currently lives in Moscow and is working on her Masters in Athletic Training at University of Idaho. She hopes to use her skills for injury prevention and management for dancers.


Session Title: Optimizing Dance Performance Through Nutrition & Supplemental Training

Dancers and other aesthetic athletes strive for perfection within the context of their sport. Athletes, particularly female athletes, participating in aesthetic sports (dancers, gymnastics, figure skaters, divers, etc.) strive to attain an  ideal body image. Dancers in particular pose an additional issue in that they are performing artists and are often not considered athletes. This subpopulation of athletes experiences greater pressure to reduce body weight and improve body composition than athletes who compete in sports which do not consider leanness to be of primary importance The physical demands placed on dancers from choreography and performance schedules make their body composition, physiology and optimal fitness just as important as their technique development. Supplemental training to addition to classical dance training is not widely practiced to improve physical fitness parameters such as strength, power, or mobility. Supplemental strength and aerobic training have shown positive improvements in performance for a dance population and may be a realistic way to optimize performance. Dietary modifications may be an additional way to optimize performance without lengthy time commitments. Body composition, specifically fat mass and lean mass, have shown positive changes in response to increased protein intake in athletic populations. Increasing protein consumption in a dance population may provide a healthy alternative to maintain the lean aesthetic demand of dance while providing adequate calories and nutrients to repair muscle damage and prevent injury. Improvements in body composition from supplemental protein alone may enhance aesthetics of dance performance. Efforts have been made to identify problems, create assessment tools, and develop potential solutions to these critical health issues in dance. Currently, the discussion of these issues is limited and needs to happen in order to improve knowledge on how dancers should properly fuel for their events. Increased knowledge of supplemental training and nutrition in dance will aid to optimize performance, improve overall health, and reduce the risk for injury. This proposal directly fits the conference theme of embodying healthy practices by disseminating the current literature on nutrition and supplemental training for dancers.

Ann F. Brown, PhD, CISSN, graduated from the Florida State University in 2016 with her doctorate in exercise physiology with a research focus in sports nutrition. While finishing her doctorate she completed her didactic program in dietetics and became a certified sports nutritionist (CISSN). She studied Biology at Seattle University all while being a member of a pre-professional dance company which has allowed her to combine her education and interests into a developing area of research, dance science. She has presented her research at the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science Conference on the link between collegiate dancer nutrition, body composition and performance as well as other various regional and national conferences such as the American College of Sports Medicine.




Session Title: Female Athlete Triad Education among High School Athletes and Collegiate Dancers

The female athlete triad (Triad) is a condition characterized by low energy availability, menstrual irregularity, and decreased bone mineral density. Female athletes, including dancers, are at risk for the Triad. Previous research indicates that knowledge of the Triad and the potential impact it may have on female athletes health and physical performance is limited among athletes, dancers, and coaches. The Triad puts female athletes in danger of both immediate and long-term health consequences, including the risk of experiencing stress fractures and the potential future development of osteoporosis. Previous research studies employing education interventions ranging from 90 minutes to four hours in length have reported Triad knowledge improvement among female athletes following a Triad education intervention. Due to factors such as busy practice and competition schedules, there is a need for concise educational interventions. A 10-minute video that included Registered Dietitians describing Triad etiology, progression, and prevention, as well as testimonies of coaches and former college athletes who experienced the Triad was developed. Faculty and student researchers at the University of Idaho conducted studies with high school (n=93; cheerleaders/dancers n=24) and collegiate dancers (n=24) to assess changes in Triad knowledge before and after viewing the 10-minute educational video. In both cases, changes in knowledge were similar to those reported in studies utilizing longer educational interventions.  These results suggest that this brief Triad educational video may be used by nutrition professionals and dance educators as an easy and effective tool to improve dancers Triad knowledge and promote behavior change to decrease Triad risk factors.

Katie Brown is an Assistant Professor at the University of Idaho and is faculty in the Coordinated Program in Dietetics. She earned her Bachelors and Doctoral degrees from Utah State University. Her primary research area is the Female Athlete Triad (Triad), which occurs when female athletes do not consume adequate calories, and may result in menstrual irregularity, and bone loss. She strives to educate athletes, teachers, and coaches about this important topic using evidence-based content and strategies.


Michelle Little is a senior at the University of Idaho majoring in Nutrition and Dietetics. She will sit for the national registration exam following graduation to become a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN). This past year, she was the lead researcher examining UI dancers risk for the female athlete triad and disordered eating. Michelle is also a dance instructor at Bloom Dance Studio in Omaha, Nebraska, her hometown. She danced for UIs dance team for 2 years, among 8 other years of formal training.


Rachel Krick is a M.S. Candidate and senior in the Coordinated Program in Dietetics at the University of Idaho School of Family and Consumer Sciences. The focus of her thesis research is assessing changes in knowledge of the female athlete triad among female high school athletes following a brief nutrition education intervention. Ninety-three female high school athletes from Northern Idaho participated in her study, twenty-four of which were cheerleaders/dancers. Rachel will also sit for the Registration Examination for Dietitians in order to become a certified RDN in 2018.





Session Title: Flamenco Dance: Cultural Dance of Southern Spain

In this session, participants will be introduced to the components of flamenco dance. This rhythmic dance form has a structure which allows all performers to work with each other. Arm work (braceo), footwork (escobilla), and clapping (palmas) will be introduced into one of the traditional forms (palo). A short description of interaction in live dance will also be included. Dancers are encouraged to wear a hard-soled shoe but it is not required for participation. Flamenco is most often performed with live music, where the dancer gets to interact in the moment, make choices, sometime direct the tempo and structure choice and IS a musician with the other performers. The presentation will include discussion based around this theme in Flamenco. Session tracks:

Kelli Brown is currently a dance educator at Idaho Arts Charter School in Nampa, Idaho. She obtained her MFA in Dance from the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee and her MA in Dance from Cal State University, Long Beach. She has her RYT 200 Certification and her CRYT Certification. Ms. Browns was the Artistic Director of Off Center Dance in Boise for 8 years. In 2016, she was awarded the IDEƓ K-12 Dance Educator of the year. For the past four years, she has traveled to Spain to study Flamenco and has been awarded both a Fund for Teachers Fellowship and an Alexa Rose Foundation Fellowship to pursue her flamenco focus.



Session Title: Modern Technique

Modern dance class based in the Merce Cunningham technique to develop articulation of the spine, directionality, and clarity of movement. Strength, use of space, and kinesthetic awareness will be emphasized in performance of exercises.
Vincas Greene, dance artist and award winning professor, is the founding director of Vytal Movement Dance Company in Spokane, WA. Vincas, who earned his M.F.A. from California Institute of the Arts, teaches and choreographs nationally at colleges, high schools, festivals, and studios, and earned the honor of being a hosted master teacher at Nanyang Normal University in China. Working with Brenau University, the Gainesville Ballet Company, Theatre Ballet of Spokane, Belhaven University, Jacksonville University, Santa Clarita Repertory Theatre, Pebblebrook Performing Arts High School and others, he has choreographed over 40 dances and three operas. Vincas performed nationally with Carl Ratcliff, Red Clay, Pat Catterson, the Mesopotamian Opera Company, the CalArts Dance Ensemble, and Erin Matthiessen and apprenticed with the Mark Morris Dance Group. He was privileged to perform dance works by Mark Morris, Merce Cunningham, and Jacques Heim (Diavolo) and received scholarships to study at the Merce Cunningham studio. As the Chair for the Department of Dance, he led Brenau University to full accreditation with the National Association of Schools of Dance. Vincas was elected to the NASD Commission on Accreditation and served as a Visiting Evaluator for NASD and as a board member for Dance Upon Injustice. He has also written for Dance Informa. Since returning to his home in Eastern Washington, he aims to build an adult dance community and promote professional dance in the region.



Session Title: Floor Barre for ALL: Ballet, Modern, Jazz

Learn a complete floor barre workout that strengthens, stretches and warms up all the muscle groups imperative for strong dance technique. With great attention to detail, this series of floor exercises imitates the muscular control needed for correct alignment and technique while standing, thus preventing injuries, and increasing body awareness. From head to toe, nothing is left out. Session Tracks: HE, K-12, PS
Marla Hansen is the Artistic Director of Idaho Dance Theatre (IDT), which she and her husband, Alfred, founded in 1989. Since that time, she has choreographed over 69 ballets for IDT. Marla has collaborated numerous times with other artists including composers, musicians, actors, designers, and visual artists. An acclaimed teacher, Marla was named the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, Dance Educator of the Year in the Northwest District. In February of 2015 she was honored as one of the Idaho Business Reviews Women of the Year, a prestigious award in the state of Idaho.  Marla is also an Associate Professor at Boise State University in the Department of Theatre Arts and directs the Dance Minor, the Dance Option BA Theatre Degree and the BSU-IDT Summer DanceFest workshop.

Session Title: Feldenkrais...Awareness Through Movement

Experience a wonderful session cued by Feldenkrais practitioner Lori Head.  Dr. Head will expose participants to the awareness in the body to improve upon functioning in all levels, enabling the potential for spontaneity and flexibility.   Dr. Heads first exposure to the Feldenkrais method was at an ACDF conference in the early 1980s.   The method structures the lesson like artwork.

Session Title: Beginning Ballroom Dancing

Ballroom is fun, a great movement activity, and develops the social side of dancing.   The class will cove basic steps, partnering techniques, and ballroom lingo in Cha-cha and waltz.   Dr. Head will be delighted to take requests within the time allowed for your favorite ballroom dance.options are foxtrot, salsa, tango, samba, swing!!!!!  

Lori Head is completing 17 years at Idaho State University, prior to owning and operating her own dance studio in Twin Falls, Idaho for 17 years.   Loris background is extensive in Figure skating, Feldenkrais, Yoga, Pilates, Gyrokinesis, and all forms of dance. She has a BS from Boise State University, MA from Arizona State University, and a PhD. from the University of Idaho.   Lori has been   National Dance President for the American Association of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance.   She has also presented for the ACDF circuit since the early 1990s. Lori was a former Ice Capades member and also skated for Holiday on Ice International. As a dance teacher, performer, and still a student, dance is life.

Session Title: Lighting Design for Dance

During this session participants will learn about the lighting design process for a dance performance. Topics covered will include aspects of lighting design that are important for and specific to dance, the lighting design process, and ideas for how to collaborate with a lighting designer, among others. Participants will leave this session able to contribute effectively to the lighting design process. The session will provide participants the opportunity to learn about an aspect of dance performance production that is not often taught or learned by dancers and choreographers, but which is important to understand when working in dance production from any perspective. Material will be presented from both the perspective of the lighting designer and the choreographer, rather than just as a lighting designer or a choreographer, so participants will see the roles of both people in the process, and how the two roles impact each other. By understanding both sides of the process, dancers and choreographers will be able to have a healthy, collaborative relationship with the lighting designers with whom they work. The relationship will allow both the choreographer and lighting designer to learn from each other and grow. Teachers can take away material from this session to share with their students to help them understand and appreciate the lighting design process while they are participating in the process as a performer. This will lead to them having a prior knowledge of the process when they become more involved in the process later as a choreographer. The information presented during this session will also help those involved in dance productions advocate for the technological needs for dance performances. They will leave understanding what is needed in their space, such as more lights or new lighting systems, especially when seeking funding.

Elizabeth Helwick grew up dancing at Port Angeles Dance Center in Port Angeles, WA, studying ballet, jazz, and pointe, as well as participating on the dance team at Port Angeles High School. She attended University of Idaho, graduating in May 2017 with a Bachelors of Science in Dance. While there, Elizabeth performed in several student and faculty choreographed works, as well as working with three guest choreographers. Elizabeth developed an interest in lighting design during this time, and lighting design for dance was the topic of her senior project. Now that she has graduated, Elizabeth plans to continue teaching dance, as well as continuing to work as a lighting designer, exploring and learning more about lighting design for dance.



Session Title: Beyond Anatomy: helping students feel confident in discovering 'their own way' in a modern technique class.

There are so many ways the body 'works'. We all have bodies, we all move.  Anatomy is helpful and essential for students to study, however the parts of our body do not exist in isolation. Every part is connected to the whole of who we are.  Our anatomy exists in relationships and a change in one part affects the whole.  In my movement session I am exploring how to invite dance science into a modern technique class using a somatic approach. This requires a language that combines the words, "breath", "body", "movement", "muscles", and "bones" along with the words "mind", "spirit", "energy", "sensation" and "emotion".  How can the study of Anatomy be an embodied practice for my dance students?  Our bodies change and so does our understanding of Anatomy.   What happens when we focus on the nervous system and approach anatomical learning from that perspective?

Molly S. Jorgensen (MFA, CLMA, SME), is a dance educator, choreographer, performer, and artist. She holds a Master of Fine Arts in Modern Dance from the University of Utah and a Bachelor of Arts in dance from Brigham Young University. As a dance educator, Molly has taught a variety of dance courses at Brigham Young University, The University of Utah, Salt Lake Community College and most recently Idaho State University. As a performer, she has danced with the University of Utahs Performing Dance Company. She toured the Midwestern United States with The BYU Dancers Company and internationally with the BYU-I Contemporary Dance Theatre. Her choreographic work 'Assuage (uh-sweyj)' was selected to perform at the ACDFA Northwest Region Gala concert in 2011. Molly received grant support from the Idaho Commission on the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts to direct a site-specific dance event in Pocatello, ID as part of an international event known as Global Water Dances. Molly is a certified Yoga instructor and Somatic Movement Educator (SME) and is currently teaching Yoga and Somatic classes in the Pocatello community. During her graduate studies, Molly spent her summers training intensely within the Integrated Movement Studies program and is a Certified Laban/Bartenieff Movement Analyst (CLMA). Joined ISU Faculty in 2007


Session Title:  Empowering Studio Dance Students

This session will share Elevated Dance Studios model for structuring performing and competing companies and the benefits of this model. Our goal for our students is to help them find and understand their personal power and identity as a young man or young woman, and support the standards of our studio families. This year, each company will be representing their name with a platform. That platform will be what they stand for and embody for the year. They are responsible, along with their teachers and parents, to figure out how they want to share their platform among the other EDP companies, throughout the studio, and in the community.  

Kim Machado: Music and movement have been part of Kim Machados life since she can remember. Her first official dance classes were hula lessons on the island of Oahu, and the passion for dance grew from there. Kim was captain of her high school dance team, the Meridian Warriorettes, and a member of the Boise State Mane Line Dancers. While living in La Grande, Oregon for 5 years, she coached the Eastern Oregon University Summit Dancers, taught the local kids jazz, hip hop, and lyrical classes, and studied ballet and modern. Kim would also drive back to Boise to take classes at Dance Dimensions. She moved back to Boise in 2000, and taught under Julie Stevens and Teresa Vaughan at Dance Dimensions for the next 7 years. In 2007, Kim and her good friend, Melissa Larson, opened Elevated Dance Project in Eagle, Idaho. This year marks EDPs 10 year anniversary. All styles of dance
inspire Mrs. Kim, but a few of her favorites include musical theater, contemporary, improvisation, and jazz. Some of her biggest influences have been Mikhail Baryshnikov, Julie Stevens, Teresa Vaughan, Jenn Freeman, Justin Giles, Chris Jacobsen, Caroline Lewis Jones, Isabel Machado, and Melissa Larson. One of the most important reasons she teaches is to help dancers find the power within themselves to accomplish their goals. Kim continues to observe and take classes at studios and conventions throughout the
Northwest. She believes there is endless potential in each human being, and never wants to stop learning! Kim Machado is co-owner of Elevated Dance Project in Eagle, Idaho. She is married to Steve Machado, has 3 wonderful children, a fabulous daughter in law, and 3 amazing grandkids.

Session Title: Dance Data: Discussing Dancer Health Screens

In the field of dance science, we strive to provide evidence-based information to enhance health, well-being, training, and performance for dancers. Dance science uses scientifically validated tools to measure outcomes to determine causes, effects, correlations, differences, and associations. These measures can help us determine the most effective training methods, injury prevention strategies, and health practices.

Dance data means many things, from simple technical measurements of turn-out, flexibility, or muscle strength to complex measurements of tracking injury rates and advanced technologies, such as 3-D motion capture and EMG. Dance institutions can benefit from gathering basic data to monitor student progress, injury rates, and injury risk factors.

Many organizations, like Dance USA and One Dance UK, are using dancer screenings. A typical dance screen is a series of tests designed to assess the overall well-being and functional capacity of dancers. The data collected are used to provide a physical, medical, nutritional, and/or psychological profile for each dancer. The results of a screen can help teachers and other dance professionals enable dancers to realize their full potential, and may also help detect potentially life-threatening or disabling medical or musculoskeletal conditions that may limit a dancers safe participation and conditions that may predispose dancers to injury and/or illness. More importantly, many professionals have suggested that screening can play a role in enhancing a dancers ability and may help them change patterns of movement that might result in stronger bodies and better dancing.

In this presentation, the following questions will be concisely discussed: What does the research show regarding the effectiveness of dance screenings? What are the pros and cons of screenings for institutions, teachers, and students? What kind of data is being gathered? Who should conduct screenings? How should the data be stored and analyzed? What are the time and cost benefits and constraints? Are there alternatives to screenings?

The benefit of discussing screenings and data gathering tools can aide institutions by educating them on screenings current uses, and provide information to help them determine if their institution can benefit from conducting them. This perspective will provide an objective introduction to screenings, and a research-based discussion as to the efficacy and plausibility of using health screenings for dancers. Healthy practices can be embodied by presenting information about tools for addressing dance risks before they become injury and advocates the importance of preventative measures in safe dance practices.  

Tara McFarland holds an MSc in Dance Science from Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music & Dance in London, UK, and a BSc in Dance from the University of Idaho. She has performed professionally in contemporary and jazz companies in Colorado, Washington, and Montana. She has over 10-years teaching experience in ballet, jazz, contemporary, and hip-hop, and has acted as director of a Bboyz Crew, Youth Ballet Company, and Performance Team. She is a member of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science, the Performing Artists Medical Association, Seattle Dance & Performing Arts Medicine, and is a steering committee member for Dance Wires Healthy Dancer Network. She has assisted with dancer health screenings at Laban Health, One Dance UK, SeaPAM, and Cornish College of the Arts. She currently teaches dance in Missoula, MT and is a company member with Bare Bait Dance Company.




Session Title: Movement in the Classroom  Elementary Dance Education

Using the dance standards to wake up the senses, this movement workshop will get you engaged in multiple learning paths allowing every child to excel and feel successful. The dance activities I have used for the past 25 years allow the childrens joy and excitement to come alive as they work on themes within their classroom environment.  Sharing how the lesson plans progress for K-5 will be explored including use of props and connecting with subject matter such as science, social studies and the artistic process of creating.

Session Title: Pilates for Dance  Healthy Practice with Mat work

Pilates improves core strength for dancers which leads to understanding of alignment needed for optimal use of the body for dance. Consistency with simple sequences and breath guides students through a series of exercises for achieving a balanced physical fitness of strength and flexibility. This development of body-mind integration contributes to physical well-being. The general principals are to integrate the entire body to strengthen the muscles, find breath of movement for flow of energy, by using concentration and control.  There are approximately 20 basic exercises and hundreds of variations.  Hilarie has been a certified Pilates instructor since 1998, with the Physical Mind Institute, but has used these principles her entire career as a dancer. Over 40 years of teaching experience working with children and adults.

Hilarie Neely began her dance training at elementary level and decided, this is what she wanted to do in life, DANCE.  She studied under the Cecchetti Ballet method and received her BFA in Dance from Southern Methodist University with a modern dance performing emphasis. Hilarie then joined the Portland Dance Theater, where she performed and taught throughout the West. In 1980 she moved to Idaho and co-founded the Idaho Dance Ensemble with Carl Rowe that toured throughout Idaho and Wyoming, performing and teaching. It was her contacts with the Idaho Commission on the Arts that got her involved in the Artist-In-Education program and began her shift towards dance education. Hilarie is owner/director of Footlight Dance Centre in Ketchum/Hailey, Idaho teaching creative movement, ballet, jazz and tap. For over thirty years she has been presenting education dance lecture-demonstration performances in all Blaine County Schools to promote the art of dance. She was the creator and administrator of the Idaho Dance Project in the early 90s, that taught public elementary teachers all over the state of Idaho the fundamentals to integrate dance into their curriculum.  She served on the State Department of Educations Curriculum writing of the Arts  - the Dance Curriculum for Idaho Schools 2000. She is a Licentiate member of the Cecchetti Council of America, holding Professional Grade 6, and has consulted as a dance specialist for the state of Idaho and State Department of Education.  Hilarie has been the recipient of numerous grants from Idaho Commission on the Arts for varying dance projects and has also received an Idaho Artist Apprenticeship Grant Award. She served on the Idaho Arts Alliance for Education, network of the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC, as a board member and also president.  She is a board member of the Idaho Dance Education Organization, member of the National Dance Education Organization and Registered Dance Educator. She has been active advocating for the arts in the Blaine County Schools and is a faculty member of the Performing Arts Academy with a theater emphasis instituted at Wood River High School.  She was a founding member of the Wood River Arts Alliance that networked the arts organizations in the Wood River Valley promoting the arts. She is currently on the board of the Ketchum Arts Commission. She taught for 25 yrs. at the Community School, dance specialist. Hilarie was honored with the 2005 Northwest District Dance Educator of the Year K-12 by NDA/AAHPERD. She keeps her body in line teaching Pilates mat classes, (certified instructor), adjunct faculty at CSI/Hailey Campus & YMCA/Ketchum. She is consistently bringing the arts and dance to the forefront in her community, collaborating with artists and community members in all other disciplines.  

Session Title: Inclusive Community Dance Programs: From Zagdance to Dance for Parkinsons

Strategies for Dance Instruction is a course in which student learn best teaching practices.  
This takes place in a classroom setting, though teaching in our free afterschool dance program (ZagDance), and Dance Parkinsons Program.  ZagDance is provided to students from local schools that have 90% free and reduced lunch populations. Dance for Parkinsons is for community members and their care partners impacted by Parkinsons Disease.  

In the course, undergraduate dance students learn how to make dance education inclusive.  They study and apply effective teaching techniques for all learners from 5th grade to elder communities, taking into consideration different physical, cognitive, and social-emotional abilities of their students.  Various tools, strategies, methodologies and approaches are taught in a university classroom setting and then students have the opportunity to directly apply this new knowledge in real life dance classes (under faculty supervision). This innovative program advances equity and expands access to dance education.  

In this presentation I will share the impetus, process and ongoing maintenance of both the course and the diverse programs.  This shows how such programs are important to the communities we serve as well as our dance students. The focus is on how these programs are replicable in other university programs, private studios, community centers etc.

Session Title: Art and Science of Dance and the Beautiful Weapons tour

Interdisciplinary collaborations help to expand dance audiences and are effective in making dance education inclusive.  The first-year seminar course, Art and Science of Dance, exposes students from a variety of undergraduate fields to dance.  They study dance as an art form, a social galvanizer and a way to make meaning in perceived disparate fields such as biology.  Team taught with a Biology Professor, every class is integrated with the practice of dance technique and study of biology.  Students attend dance performance, learn dance history and choreography incorporating the elements of biology and dance studied in class.  The final assignment requires small groups of students to choose a complex concept from biology and create a dance physically articulating their research.  The vast majority of students have zero or very little dance experience and the class is typically equally divided between male and female undergraduate freshmen.  

The course rewards students to see that interdisciplinary thinking and engaging in the arts (particularly dance) expands their education.  We now take this notion beyond the classroom.  My colleague from Biology and I created Beautiful Weapons, a touring performance/lecture of his research on diversity in biology.  My creative research has been working with a composer, developing a tour, casting a company and creating the work based on the science behind the understanding of weapon development in animals.  

In this presentation, I will share the work from the course and we will give a lecture and demonstration on the tour to regional universities.  This arts-integration and interdisciplinary curriculum serves as a model for my university, for the conversations it creates within the arts and sciences at the schools we visit and as a catalyst for ideas for other dance groups.  

Suzanne Ostersmith M.F.A. is the Director of the Dance and Interdisciplinary Arts Programs at Gonzaga University, Spokane Washington.  As a dance, theatre and visual artist, professor and scholar, Suzanne is interested in how various art forms and concepts intersect to inspire creativity and innovation.  In 2000 she founded the dance programs at both Whitworth and Gonzaga University and continued to direct both for a decade.  Now, solely at Gonzaga, she continues to develop the curriculum and performance opportunities for the dance program while also forming and directing a new Interdisciplinary Arts Minor.  Courses she has developed and taught are Movement for the Performer, Interdisciplinary Arts, Choreography, Jazz I and II, Strategies for Dance Instruction, Musical Theatre Dance and most recently a first year seminar course, the Art and Science of Dance (team taught with a colleague from Biology).  Suzanne is a sought after collaborator and creative (she was awarded Faculty of the Year Award for Collaboration and Innovation in 2017) who also teaches for the Masters in Organizational Leadership degree program at Gonzaga. Suzanne serves as a national board member for the American College Dance Association and annually brings students and work to regional conferences.  This past summer she taught Interdisciplinary Arts for Gonzaga in London, England as part of the Universitys Art and Spirituality of London study abroad program.  Her research and creative inquiry on dance pioneer and interdisciplinary artist, Loie Fuller was performed and presented at the Jundt Art Museum, Gonzaga Spring Dance Concert and the Maryhill Fine Art Museum on the Columbia Gorge.  Favorite directing and choreography credits at Gonzaga University include Jesus Christ Superstar, Weaving Our Sisters Voices, Chicago, Pippin, and Spring Dance Concert 2002-2017.  Currently she is working on a new dance/science tour about bio-diversity developed from her collaboration with the Biology Department.

Session Title: Creating Connections

This presentation will highlight techniques to help empower youth through movement. We will discuss positive self-talk, imagery, relaxation, goal setting, and how to incorporate these skills into dance. In this presentation, we will also talk about the benefits of dance. Movement provides an opportunity for children to make creative decisions, collaborate with others, take ownership and contribute to their learning environment while helping them make connections to their mind, body and spirit. Students also learn more about performance, celebrating others, and use multiple observation techniques.  Using different pattern phrasing, images, and sounds, students can learn memorization techniques and apply other subjects and skills to movement.  This presentation will target nurturing movement activities, creativity, and fun.

Ginny Robinson has been dancing for over 20 years. She received her Bachelors of Science in Dance from the University of Idaho in 2013 and is now pursuing her Masters in Movement Sciences. Ginny has been teaching dance and fitness for several years and loves helping others discover their strengths in movement. Outside of school and work, Ginny enjoys traveling, reading and spending time with family and friends.

Session Title: Pilates for Dancers

Cross conditioning for dancers is important during all levels of training for injury prevention and performance enhancement. Pilates specifically has been proven to strengthen and mobilize the body with alignment principles that apply directly to those that dancers need. The Pilates Mat class that I am proposing will include exercises developed by dance kinesiology expert, Karen Clippinger, as well as other contemporary Pilates exercises that are exceptional for dancers and their specific needs. Not only does this practice address the physical aspect of healthy practice, but it also addresses the mental aspect. There is a necessity to be mindful throughout Pilates practices that keeps the intention and the action in alignment. This thoughtful approach to movement can help the dancer when in the studio listen to their body and stay present and focused when in class, performance, or auditions. This session will have a dance-specific twist on exercises that target areas that dancers utilize on a daily basis. I am excited to share the knowledge that I have acquired in Pilates and deliver that information to movers of all skill levels and settings alike. This session compliments this years conference theme of embodying healthy practices through multiple facets of this idea of health. Dancers need to be educated as a whole person, and this session would do just that.


Lauren Smith is a dancer, choreographer, teacher, and arts advocate. She graduated magna cum laude from the University of Idaho with a Bachelor of Science in Dance and a Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science and Health where she twice received the Outstanding Dance Major award. She has taught modern, ballet, jazz, and Pilates courses for the university as well as for various dance academies in Idaho, Washington, Utah, and Alaska. She has danced professionally with Vytal Movement Dance Company, Wasatch II Contemporary Dance Company, and Long Beach Ballet performing throughout China and across the United States. A solo performance of hers was selected to be performed at the 2017 SoloDuo Festival in New York City. Her choreographic work has been showcased at the University of Idaho, American College Dance Association, National Water Dance Organization, and throughout the Pacific Northwest on tour with DancersDrummersDreamers®. Lauren recently completed her Comprehensive Pilates Teacher Training with Dance Specialization through Body Arts and Science International under Karen Clippinger. She is a member of the International Association for Dance Medicine and Science where her research in dance biomechanics was chosen for presentation in 2015. Lauren is interested in researching dance through performance and somatic practices.


Session Title: Balancing the Body Using Contralateral Movement: A Technique for Injury Prevention, Pain Reduction, and Increasing Range of Motion

Symmetry and flexibility is paramount in performing arts, not only for performance success, but for injury prevention. Total Motion Release is a warm up and injury prevention activity that creates symmetry and increases free mobility throughout the entire body. This session includes a short introduction to the technique then a laboratory activity in which participants will perform the technique and experience its benefits.

Lindsay Larkins came to the University of Idaho with a range of athletic training experience in several clinical settings. After completing her undergraduate degree while participating as a student-athlete at the University of Southern California, she decided to
pursue a professional masters degree in athletic training from California Baptist University. She completed her degree in 2011, and began working as a physician extender for a renowned orthopedic surgeon in Riverside, California. In 2012, she moved to Malibu, California, to work as an assistant athletic trainer for Pepperdine University where she was able to assist the womens beach volleyball team to a National
Championship. She began her doctoral study through the University of Idaho, which led her to take a position as Clinical Education Coordinator and assistant professor at California Baptist  her alma mater. While completing her doctoral work and in her time off from teaching, she served as Head Athletic Trainer, then Medical Director for an
independent professional baseball team. Lindsay began teaching at UI full time in June 2015. She enjoys spending time with her Great Dane, traveling, hiking, camping and being outside as much as possible.


Session Title: Transitional Training

This session discusses how training in dance is transitional, & how we as teachers should train kids with that thought process. I will also be discussing how to properly warm up, how teachers should remain students, teachers being teachers not just friends with their students, using our intuition & our ability to see that "this" is really about "that", & how to give strong discipline with encouragement at the same time

ReSeanPates is an Alabama bred turned Mesa, Arizona triple threat! He has been dancing & teaching professionally for 10 years. His most recent credits include NBC's Hairspray Live as Jackie, the assistant choreographer to Daniel Ezralow for Katy Perry's "Chained to the Rhyusic video and her 2017 promo tour (2017 Grammys, 2017 Brit Awards, Londons's BBC Big Radio Music Festival, 2017 Met Gala, 2017 Brandcast) and Assistant choreographer/ dancer for Shania Twain's "Life's About to Get Good" music video. Other past credits include Glee seasons 3-6 as a Dalton Academy Warbler, Apple Sports Watch commercial, Daniel Ezralow's 3 world tours (OPEN Italy & US Tour, Pearl live at the Lincoln Center & Canadian Tour, Primo Passo), assistant choreographer to Bonnie Story for SYTYCD Next Generation, and Crazy Ex Girlfriend!  

ReSean is THRILLED to be doing a 2 month stint at his "second home" in Boise, Idaho and is looking forwards to getting back to one of his biggest loves, teaching!


Session Title: Building Partnerships in Dance

This session will look at how Festival Dance and Performing Arts, a non-profit dance presenter and academy, benefits from its "in residence" status at the University of Idaho, and in turn, what's in it for the university. Festival Dance Director, Abby Glanville, will share the history of Festival Dance and discuss the partnerships and collaborations it has built with various sectors within the University of Idaho. This session aims to promote discussion among attendees on their experiences building partnerships and collaborations between dance studios or programs with other organizations or institutions, and how to further capitalize on these opportunities.

Abby Glanville is in her 4th year serving as Director of Festival Dance and Performing Arts. Since starting in July 2014, she has implemented three seasons of Great Performances, outreach, and Festival Dance Academy activities. Ms. Glanville has a Bachelor of Arts in Art History from the University of Iowa, and a Master of Science in Historic Preservation from the University of Oregon. Her work in historic preservation includes serving as a consultant for Benton County Historic Resources Commission and Crater Lake National Park, both in Oregon; as well as working for three years as a Project Architectural Historian for Wapsi Valley Archaeology, Inc. in Iowa. Her work in the arts includes serving three years as the Performing Arts Coordinator for Project Art at University of Iowa Hospitals, where she coordinated weekly arts events and special programs for hospital patients, visitors, and staff. She also has 8 years of combined teaching and choreographing experience between Muscatine Academy of Music and Dance in Iowa, and Festival Dance Academy.

Session Title: Modern Technique

A modern dance class based in the Merce Cunningham technique designed to develop articulation of the spine, directionality, and clarity of movement. Strength, use of space, and kinesthetic awareness will be emphasized in performance of exercises.  
Vincas Greene, dance artist and award winning professor, is the founding director of Vytal Movement Dance Company in Spokane, WA. Vincas, who earned his M.F.A. from California Institute of the Arts, teaches and choreographs nationally at colleges, high schools, festivals, and studios, and earned the honor of being a hosted master teacher at Nanyang Normal University in China. Working with Brenau University, the Gainesville Ballet Company, Theatre Ballet of Spokane, Belhaven University, Jacksonville University, Santa Clarita Repertory Theatre, Pebblebrook Performing Arts High School and others, he has choreographed over 40 dances and three operas. Vincas performed nationally with Carl Ratcliff, Red Clay, Pat Catterson, the Mesopotamian Opera Company, the CalArts Dance Ensemble, and Erin Matthiessen and apprenticed with the Mark Morris Dance Group. He was privileged to perform dance works by Mark Morris, Merce Cunningham, and Jacques Heim (Diavolo) and received scholarships to study at the Merce Cunningham studio. As the Chair for the Department of Dance, he led Brenau University to full accreditation with the National Association of Schools of Dance. Vincas was elected to the NASD Commission on Accreditation and served as a Visiting Evaluator for NASD and as a board member for Dance Upon Injustice. He has also written for Dance Informa. Since returning to his home in Eastern Washington, he aims to build an adult dance community and promote professional dance in the region.

Session Title: Lighting Design for Dance

During this session participants will learn about the lighting design process for a dance performance. Topics covered will include aspects of lighting design that are important for and specific to dance, the lighting design process, and ideas for how to collaborate with a lighting designer, among others. Participants will leave this session able to contribute effectively to the lighting design process. The session will provide participants the opportunity to learn about an aspect of dance performance production that is not often taught or learned by dancers and choreographers, but which is important to understand when working in dance production from any perspective. Material will be presented from both the perspective of the lighting designer and the choreographer, rather than just as a lighting designer or a choreographer, so participants will see the roles of both people in the process, and how the two roles impact each other. By understanding both sides of the process, dancers and choreographers will be able to have a healthy, collaborative relationship with the lighting designers with whom they work. The relationship will allow both the choreographer and lighting designer to learn from each other and grow. Teachers can take away material from this session to share with their students to help them understand and appreciate the lighting design process while they are participating in the process as a performer. This will lead to them having a prior knowledge of the process when they become more involved in the process later as a choreographer. The information presented during this session will also help those involved in dance productions advocate for the technological needs for dance performances. They will leave understanding what is needed in their space, such as more lights or new lighting systems, especially when seeking funding.


Elizabeth Helwick grew up dancing at Port Angeles Dance Center in Port Angeles, WA, studying ballet, jazz, and pointe, as well as participating on the dance team at Port Angeles High School. She attended University of Idaho, graduating in May 2017 with a Bachelors of Science in Dance. While there, Elizabeth performed in several student and faculty choreographed works, as well as working with three guest choreographers. Elizabeth developed an interest in lighting design during this time, and lighting design for dance was the topic of her senior project. Now that she has graduated, Elizabeth plans to continue teaching dance, as well as continuing to work as a lighting designer, exploring and learning more about lighting design for dance.

Session Title:  TAKING THE SPACE: My years of advocating dance in the state system

This session will focus on the historical progression of developing statewide dance documents and educational events over the past 49 years, discussing the plusses and problems of working with and within the Idaho government.  Walkers hope is to share some institutional memory to support current efforts to promote dance within the State Department of Education and looks forward to questions and a lively discussion.

Diane has a long history of statewide service to dance.  She gained Teaching Certification for Dance in 1974, co-authored the first state curriculum guide in dance in the United States plus the Idaho K-12 Fine Arts Content Guide and the Idaho 9-12 Humanities
Achievement Standards. She was a founding member of the Idaho Alliance for Arts
Education and the Idaho Very Special Arts Festival.  As head of the UIdaho Center for
Dance, she developed the undergraduate Bachelor of Dance and Bachelor of Science in Dance degrees and the graduate Dance Pedagogy degree program.  Diane is still actively involved in supporting the dance programs at UIdaho and within the state.

Session Title: Conditioning to Choreography

This session will explore expanding the range of certain anatomical foci to form choreographic ideas that can be linked and performed in a series.

Rachel Winchester, a native of San Diego, California and a San Diego Emerging Artist of 2009, has lived and worked in the Pacific Northwest for the past 6 years, teaching hundreds of dance students at the University of Oregon, University of Idaho, and most recently as Director of Pacific Lutheran Universitys thriving Dance Minor Program. As a choreographer, she has been honored by the American College Dance Association through selection and presentation at the National Conference in Washington D.C. Rachel has been an International Fringe Festival artist, directing and performing in San Diego and Tijuana, Mexico. Her original screendance, FACEDANCE, was featured as an official selection for the 40 North Dance Film Festival. Rachel looks forward to nurturing the diverse dance interests and talents at Pacific Lutheran University, and continuing her choreographic research in the pursuit of innovative storytelling.



IDEO Conference / Festival Schedule:

FRIDAY, OCT. 27, 2017:
IDEO 2017 Teacher Workshop: Embodying Healthy Practices
4:30-8:30 PM - Body-Mind Centering® Developmental Movement Concepts and Experiential Practices by keynoter presenter, Mary Lou Seereiter.

SATURDAY, OCT. 28, 2017:
IDEO 2017 Conference/Festival: Embodying Healthy Practices

7:00-8:00 AM  Registration and Breakfast (PEB lobby)
8:00-8:15 AM  Opening Ceremonies
8:15-9:45 AM  Keynote #1: Healthy Practices in Teaching & Learning

9:45-10:00 AM  Network/Travel Time

10:00-11:00 AM  Breakout Session 1
Studio 110 (PEB): Modern Technique: Beyond Anatomy (Molly Jorgensen)
Studio 212 (PEB): Floor Barre for All: Ballet, Modern, Jazz (Marla Hanesen)
Multipurpose Room (Mem. Gym): Transitional Training (ReSean Pates)
Gym 111 (PEB): Movement in the Classroom (Hilarie Neely)
Gym 210 (PEB): Healthy Relationship to Failure through Improvisation (Belle Baggs)
PEB 200: Optimizing Performance (Ann Brown); Whole Dancer Care (Koreen Boydstun)
PEB 201: Lighting for Dance (Elizabeth Helwick); Empowering Students (Kim Machado)

11:00-11:10  Network/Travel Time

11:10 AM-12:10 PM  Breakout Session 2
Studio 110 (PEB): Modern Technique: Cunningham (Vincas Greene)
Studio 212 (PEB): Pilates for Dance (Hilarie Neely)
Multipurpose Room (Mem. Gym): Conditioning to Choreography (Rachel Winchester)
Gym 111 (PEB): Sensory/Motor Balance in Health & Learning (Mary Seereiter)
Gym 210 (PEB): Flamenco Dance (Kelli Brown)
PEB 200: Female Athlete Triad (Brown/Little/Krick); Dancer Health Screens (Tara McFarland)
PEB 201: Feldenkrais: Awareness Through Movement (Lori Head)
Hartung Theatre: Tech Rehearsals (Schedule TBA)

12:10-12:20  Walk to the Commons for Lunch

12:20-1:50  Lunch & Member Meeting (Commons: Whitewater Clearwater Room)
Lifetime Achievement Award
National Honor Society (Molly Jorgensen/ISU students)
1:20-1:50 PM: College Dance Panel (PEB 200/201)

1:50-2:00 Travel Time

2:00-3:00  Breakout Session 3
Studio 110 (PEB): Healthy Practices in Ballet (Melanie Meenan)
Studio 212 (PEB): Pilates for Dancers (Lauren Smith)
Multipurpose Room (Mem. Gym): Creating Connections (Gin Robinson)
Gym 111 (PEB): Beginning Ballroom Dancing (Lori Head)
Gym 210 (PEB): 2:45-3pm: Art/Science Performance (Suzanne Ostersmith; see also PEB 201)
PEB 200: Partnerships in Dance (Abby Glanville); Taking the Space (Diane Walker)
PEB 201: Inclusive Dance Programs; Art & Science of Dance (Ostersmith; see also PEB 210)
AT Clinic (Ed. Building): Balancing the Body: Contralateral Movements (Lindsay Larkins)
Hartung Theatre: Tech Rehearsals (Schedule TBA)
3:00-3:10 PM  Networking/Travel Time

3:10-4:40 PM  Keynote #2 (Seereiter)

4:45-5:45 PM  Break/Networking or High School Dancers Mock Audition or Tech Rehearsal

Studio 110 (PEB): Mock Audition: High School Dancers (Baggs, Greene, Jorgensen, Swenson)
*Dancers sign-up to perform a solo and receive feedback from the panel

Hartung Theatre: Tech Rehearsals (Schedule TBA)

6:00-7:30 PM  IDEO Community Gala Concert
7:30-8:00 PM  Q&A
8:00 PM  Adjourn

PLEASE NOTE: UI is having a big football game that weekend so it is important to BOOK HOTEL ROOMS EARLY!

Would you like to perform at the IDEO conference? IDEO is looking for dance performers for the 10/28/17 Gala Performance:

Dance Performance Submission Form
IDEO 2017 Conference Embodying Healthy Practices
Gala Performance: Oct 28 (5-7pm)
Due: September 22, 2017
Submit via email to dance@uidaho.edu

Submit your choreography for an opportunity to perform in the
Hartung Theatre at the University of Idaho and represent your school or company.
Engage in a Q&A and discourse about dance making afterwards.


PERSONAL INFORMATION

School/Studio/Company Name:

Contact Person:

Email:

Phone Number:

Mailing Address:


PIECE INFORMATION

Title of Proposed Work:  

Date of Premiere: (Month/Year)

Choreographer:

Number of Performers:

Dancers Names:







Music (if any):
Length of piece:
*Work must not exceed 10 minutes in length


Props (if any):




*Artist must supply additional help if needed during tech and performance times to accommodate the needs and usage of the intended props.


Technical Needs (if any):




*Lighting will be simple (lights up and down) with three looks to choose from to support minimal tech rehearsal time. Further information will be requested upon acceptance.


Describe the Mood of the Proposed Work:






Briefly describe your proposed work:
Please limit yourself to about 500 characters (including spaces).
















VIDEO INFORMATION

Video Url:
*If you want us to view a specific work excerpt, please note the times you wish us to view. No more than two minutes, for example - [03:00-05:00]

Location

College of Education University of Idaho (View)
875 Perimeter Drive MS 2401
Moscow, ID 83844-2401
United States


Categories

Arts > Dance
Arts > Performance
Education > Classes
Education > Conventions
Education > Workshops
Other > Health & Wellness

Minimum Age: 12
Kid Friendly: Yes!
Dog Friendly: No
Non-Smoking: Yes!
Wheelchair Accessible: Yes!

Contact

Owner: Idaho Dance Education Organization
On BPT Since: May 30, 2015
 
Melanie Meenan, IDEO Conference Chair
(208) 885-2184
mmeenan@uidaho.edu
idahodeo.org
 


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